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 Table of Contents  
IMAGES IN ACADEMIC MEDICINE: REPUBLICATION
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 203-204

Complication of percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement


Department of Surgery, Division of Critical Care, Trauma, and Burn, The Ohio State University Medical Center; OPUS 12 Foundation, Inc., Columbus, OH, USA

Date of Web Publication21-Apr-2017

Correspondence Address:
Stanislaw P Stawicki
Department of Research and Innovation, St. Luke's University Health Network, EW2 Research Administration, 801 Ostrum Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJAM.IJAM_19_17

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  Abstract 


Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred method for administration of long-term enteral nutrition. However, due largely to the high acuity of the underlying disease among patients who receive PEG tubes, this procedure can be associated with a number of serious complications.
The following core competencies are addressed in this article: Medical knowledge, Patient care.
Republished with permission from: Cite as: Stawicki SP. Complication of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Tubes. OPUS 12 Scientist 2008;2(4):5.

Keywords: Medical imaging, migration, morbidity, percutaneous gastrostomy tube complications, perforation


How to cite this article:
Stawicki SP. Complication of percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement. Int J Acad Med 2017;3, Suppl S1:203-4

How to cite this URL:
Stawicki SP. Complication of percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement. Int J Acad Med [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Jun 7];3, Suppl S1:203-4. Available from: http://www.ijam-web.org/text.asp?2017/3/3/203/204950




  Introduction Top


Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred method for administration of long-term enteral nutrition. However, due largely to the high acuity of the underlying disease among patients who receive PEG tubes, this procedure can be associated with a number of serious complications.


  Discussion and Conclusion Top


PEG is the preferred method for administration of long-term enteral nutrition.[1] However, due largely to the high acuity of the underlying disease among patients who receive PEG tubes, this procedure can be associated with a number of serious complications.[2],[3] The images in [Figure 1] demonstrate some of these complications: top left – computed tomographic (CT) image showing a PEG tube inserted through the colon (i.e., gastrocolocutaneous passage); top right – same patient after the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated out of the stomach and into the colon, with a tube study showing radiographic contrast in the descending colon (arrow); bottom left – CT images showing tube migration and perforation of the second portion of the duodenum by a balloon-type PEG catheter; and bottom right – buried bumper syndrome wherein the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated into the subcutaneous tissues.
Figure 1: Radiographic images demonstrating different PEG tube related complications: top left – computed tomographic (CT) image showing a PEG tube inserted through the colon (i.e., gastrocolocutaneous passage); top right – same patient after the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated out of the stomach and into the colon, with a tube study showing radiographic contrast in the descending colon (arrow); bottom left – CT images showing tube migration and perforation of the second portion of the duodenum by a balloon-type PEG catheter; and bottom right – buried bumper syndrome where the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated into the subcutaneous tissues

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Acknowledgement

Justifications for re-publishing this scholarly content include: (a) The phasing out of the original publication after a formal merger of OPUS 12 Scientist with the International Journal of Academic Medicine and (b) Wider dissemination of the research outcome(s) and the associated scientific knowledge.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Kimyagarov S, Levenkron S, Shabi A. Artificial tube feeding of elderly suffering from advanced dementia. Harefuah 2008;147:500-3, 575.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Schrag SP, Sharma R, Jaik NP, Seamon MJ, Lukaszczyk JJ, Martin ND, et al. Complications related to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes. A comprehensive clinical review. J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2007;16:407-18.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Johnston SD, Tham TC, Mason M. Death after PEG: Results of the national confidential enquiry into patient outcome and death. Gastrointest Endosc 2008;68:223-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

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