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ERRATUM
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 46-47

Erratum: Evaluating patients using mission services in the dominican republic


Date of Web Publication27-Mar-2020

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2455-5568.281458

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How to cite this article:
. Erratum: Evaluating patients using mission services in the dominican republic. Int J Acad Med 2020;6:46-7

How to cite this URL:
. Erratum: Evaluating patients using mission services in the dominican republic. Int J Acad Med [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 May 25];6:46-7. Available from: http://www.ijam-web.org/text.asp?2020/6/1/46/281458

In the International Journal of Academic Medicine,[1] Issue 3, Year 2019, Volume 5 the following post-publication corrections and clarifications were provided by the authors:

In the ABSTRACT NUMBER 21, titled, “Evaluating Patients using Mission Services in the Dominican Republic”, published on page 219, Issue 3, Volume 5 of International Journal of Academic Medicine, the list of authors and their affiliations are written incorrectly as “ J. Rehrig, C. Boni1, R. Moore2”, “University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, Biddeford, Maine,2 University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA,1 Waves of Health Non-Profit Organization, Rutherford, New Jersey, USA”.

The correct list of authors and their affiliations should read as “J. Rehrig1, L. Vitale2, R. Moore3, C. Boni4, N. Hainsworth5, A. Tomosky6, S. Park7, “1 University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, Biddeford Maine,2 University of California Politics Department, Santa Cruz California,3 University of Maryland, College Park Maryland,4 Waves of Health Non-Profit Organization, Rutherford New Jersey,5 University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, Biddeford Maine,6 Waves of Health Non-Profit Organization, Rutherford New Jersey,7 University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, Biddeford Maine”.

In the ABSTRACT NUMBER 21, titled, “Evaluating Patients using Mission Services in the Dominican Republic”, published on page 219, Issue 3, Volume 5 of International Journal of Academic Medicine, additional post-publication content was requested to be added/clarified by the authors.

The corrected and complete version should read as follow:

Background: Medical mission trips have become a popular form of volunteer work for medical professionals, yet little data is published regarding the impact these trips have. From 1993-2013, only 67 evidence-based research manuscripts were publications analyzing medical mission care. 80% of these publications were surgical in nature. Research regarding medical mission primary care services is necessary for determining impact and areas of improvement. Waves of Health (WOH), a non-profit healthcare organization founded in 2007, partners with local services abroad to send healthcare professionals to Dominican Republic bi-annually. We hypothesized returning WHO patients were less likely to lack access to care and medications compared to those who were first time patients.

Methods:

70 patients at random were verbally asked questions from a survey about their healthcare. In the interview, qualitative and quantitative data was gathered regarding the patient's healthcare point of contact, medications, and health conditions. Patient “vulnerability” to lacking medical care was examined through the question “Did “r” need to see a doctor but was unable (vuln)?”. SPSS software was used to examine data, with Chi Square, T test, and Regression Analysis appropriately applied to access for significance and associations.

Results:

51 (73%) of individuals were returning WOH patients, with a prior visit mode of 2. The remaining 27% were first-time patients. 61% of patients said they were unable to access medical care in the past year (vulnerable variable). Of this “vulnerable” patient population, 84% were first-time patients. Chi-Square showed that there was an association between patient's who lacked access to care and held first time status (P <.05). T-test indicated that the proportion of “vulnerable” first-time patients was significant compared to “vulnerable” returning patients (P <.05). Additionally, a regression analysis found an association between patients who lacked access to medical care and ration their medication (P <.05).

Discussion: Waves of Health (WOH) supplies continued care to the majority of patients who attend our clinics. Patients reported not receiving healthcare in their community due to factors like cost, time, and transportation. When further discussing alternatives for healthcare with Dominican staff and patients, it appears public facilities often do not have the resources necessary to adequately treat patients. Further analysis of local healthcare alternatives and insufficient resources will allow medical mission trips like WOH to better, and more accurately, provide patients with the care they need. We plan to further investigate medication shortages and needs within our patient population.



 
  References Top

1.
Garg SM, Garg M, Paladino L, Jeanmonod D, Jeanmonod R, McDonald MP, et al. The Fourth Annual Academic International Medicine Congress (AIM 2019) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 26–28, 2019: Advancing Global Leadership to Promote Health Equity. Int J Acad Med 2019;5:198-239.  Back to cited text no. 1
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