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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 1: Radiographic images demonstrating different PEG tube related complications: top left – computed tomographic (CT) image showing a PEG tube inserted through the colon (i.e., gastrocolocutaneous passage); top right – same patient after the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated out of the stomach and into the colon, with a tube study showing radiographic contrast in the descending colon (arrow); bottom left – CT images showing tube migration and perforation of the second portion of the duodenum by a balloon-type PEG catheter; and bottom right – buried bumper syndrome where the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated into the subcutaneous tissues

Figure 1: Radiographic images demonstrating different PEG tube related complications: top left – computed tomographic (CT) image showing a PEG tube inserted through the colon (i.e., gastrocolocutaneous passage); top right – same patient after the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated out of the stomach and into the colon, with a tube study showing radiographic contrast in the descending colon (arrow); bottom left – CT images showing tube migration and perforation of the second portion of the duodenum by a balloon-type PEG catheter; and bottom right – buried bumper syndrome where the internal bumper of the PEG tube migrated into the subcutaneous tissues