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SYMPOSIUM: SIMULATION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 84-89

The importance of laparoscopic simulation in the continuing medical education of community surgeons


The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, USA

Correspondence Address:
Thomas J Papadimos
College of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJAM.IJAM_37_17

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One well-established challenge for medical educators and surgeons is maintaining patient safety during a period of widespread surgical skill acquisition. The incongruity between evidence-based recommendations and real-world practice highlights the inadequacy of our current continuing medical education (CME) tradition, which consists of short courses and preceptored practice. The effectiveness of short courses for surgical skill training has been questioned many times since the beginning of the laparoscopic revolution. Laparoscopic simulation trainers also offer pedagogical advantages over other CME formats because they are learner centric, allowing for skill acquisition and improvement without the responsibility of patient care. Ongoing research is providing new evidence that simulation is of paramount importance to continuing professional development as it has been in graduate medical education. After briefly outlining the limitations of our current surgical CME paradigm, this paper will suggest that medical simulation using laparoscopic simulation trainers is a powerful yet underutilized adjunct to the current methods of surgical training for the practicing community surgeon. The following core competencies are addressed in this article: Patient care, Medical knowledge, Practice-based learning and improvement.


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