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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 113-119

A cross-sectional study to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of medical students concerning antibiotic usage and antimicrobial resistance


1 Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, National University of Science and Technology, Sohar, Sultanate of Oman
2 Department of Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalagiri, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mohan B Sannathimmappa
Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, National University of Science and Technology, PO Box: 391, PC: 321, Al Tareef, Sohar
Sultanate of Oman
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJAM.IJAM_57_20

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Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major global health problem, which is mainly promoted by injudicious antibiotic usage. The main strategy to control AMR is to emphasize the appropriate use of antibiotics, which can be achieved by creating awareness about AMR, changing the attitude of medical students who are the future prescribers. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of fifth-year medical students regarding antibiotic use and AMR. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 125 fifth-year medical students of the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sohar. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding antibiotic use and AMR. The data were statistically analyzed and expressed as numbers and percentages. Results: Of 125 participants, the majority (>90%) were aware of AMR and its global impact. Nearly three in four knew that antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infection. However, most of the students had lacunae in their knowledge regarding contributing factors and consequences of AMR. A minority of students lack the right attitude toward rational antibiotic usage and adequate infection control practices. The majority of them were unaware of strict guidelines pertaining to judicious antibiotic usage and adequate infection control policies implemented in hospitals, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Conclusion: The results of our study reflect lacunae in students' knowledge regarding antibiotic usage and AMR. Therefore, there is a need for an implementation of effective medical curricula to improve medical students' knowledge regarding AMR and the appropriate use of antibiotics. The following core competencies are addressed in this article: Patient care, Medical knowledge, Professionalism, Systems-based practice, Practice-based learning and improvement, Interpersonal and communication skills.


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